Organize > Classifications

Classifications

Classifications provide a way to record descriptive information about the files and cases in your project. You can then use this information to make comparisons or to gather material by attribute.

While file and case classifications behave in a similar way, they are used for different purposes:

  • Case classifications let you provide demographic details about the people, places or other cases in your project. For example, classify a case as a Person and define attributes for age and occupation.
  • File classifications are for storing bibliographical information about your files—you can import this information from reference management tools like EndNote or Zotero. NVivo provides predefined classifications like interview and focus group to help you keep track of your files—you can add these to your project or create your own general classifications.

Working with case classifications

When you click on Case Classifications in Navigation View, you see the case classifications that are available in your project.

If you cannot see any classifications, then you may want to

Each case classification has its own unique set of attributes. For example, if you expand the classification Participant you can see the attributes that are available for recording:

Attributes for Age, Gender and Occupation added to the Participant classification.

As you classify your cases, you can specify an 'attribute value' for each attribute:

Setting attribute values for a case in List View.

Working with file classifications

When you click on File Classifications in Navigation View you will see the classifications that are available in your project.

If you cannot see any classifications, then you may want to:

Each classification has its own unique set of attributes. For example, if you expand the classification Newspaper Article you can see the attributes that are available for recording:

File classification called Newspaper Article displayed in list view with attributes for Reporter, Year and Title.

As you classify your files, you can specify an 'attribute value' for each attribute:

Setting the attribute values for a newspaper article.

When you import data from a reference management tool, the files are automatically classified and the attribute values are assigned.

When you import web pages or import content from Evernote or OneNote, the files are automatically classified as 'Reference'. Attribute values—for example, the URL and title of the web page—are assigned.

What is a classification sheet?

When you have classified your files or cases, you can open a grid that displays the attributes for all items in a particular classification—this grid is called a classification sheet.

For example, you could open the Participant classification sheet and see all the cases in this classification.

Participant classification sheet with cases and demographic information.

The cases are displayed along with their attribute values—you can sort and filter the cases based on their attribute values (for example, age and gender). You can also update attribute values via the classification sheet. Classification sheets

What are relationship types?

In Navigation View, under Codes, there is a folder for relationship types—relationship types are a special type of classification.

Relationship types describe the nature of a relationship (code) that occurs in your project. For example, you could set up a relationship type married and another relationship type lives with.

Unlike other classifications, relationship types do not have attributes—when you create a relationship type you need only define the direction of the relationship (associative, one-way, or symmetrical).